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In an area that stretches from Delaware into Georgia and westwards into the Mississippi Valley, Rose's Stores, Inc. runs a chain of more than one hundred discount stores. There is a large number of general goods in the 24,000- to 76,000-square-foot shops, serving mainly population groups of less than 50,000 people, including garment, shoes, household furnishings, small appliances, toiletries, toiletries, cosmetics, athletic items, automotive products, food, electronic goods, garden products, and occasional furniture. 

The company has restructured itself many times since it was founded as a "5, 10, and 15 Cent Store," in 1915, to adjust to an ever more competitive market. Rose was one of the most rapidly expanding diversity chains within the nation during the 1960s and early 1970s, rated in the top 10 in sales in the 1960s. But in the mid-1970s with the subsequent entry of its two major rivals - Kmart and Wal-Mart, which now oversee roughly sixth of the US $600 billion industry - the company rallied out of the Top 100 in the mid-1980s and finally was led to reorganization bankruptcy in September 1993. In the middle of 1991, a new management team was appointed to help the company overcome the downturn caused by rivalry. It was headed by former Target Store managing director George L. Jones. 

Their strategy demanded a comprehensive remerchandising of their shops, including removing and replacing categories of slow-moving goods with items that would better fit Rose's 'value-oriented' target client. For example, Rose was limited to a small number of tools and materials aimed at simple "do-it-yourself" tasks rather than providing the full collection of hardware items. Historically strong business departments, such as, health care and beauty services, or lawn and garden were enlarged. 

Trying to generate lucrative prospects for unplanned transactions, the company started its 'Greatest offer on Earth' campaign, offering an array of luxury products at 'close-out' or drastically reduced costs. Rose's latest technology has also been used to enhance customer care and management of outlets. It was introducing a state-of-the-art system allowing automatic price removal and store stock replenishment. 

The Rose's tried to succeed by reducing its marketing focus in the mid-1990s by targeting lower-income customers with special value-added discounts and double-coupon offers, highlighting goods in the surrounding areas and print shops in direct competitiveness to Wal-Mart or Kmart and 60% forced to compete with both. So ultimately, the way which allowed the company to emerge successfully from the bankruptcy in April 1995 was redefining itself as a discount retailer, reducing its operations, and adjusting its marketing strategies to the needs of its smallest income shoppers directly. 

Typical Hours of Operation

Mo 9:00 - 21:00
Tu 9:00 - 21:00
We 9:00 - 21:00
Th 9:00 - 21:00
Fr 9:00 - 21:00
Sa 9:00 - 21:00
Su 10:00 - 20:00

Locations: 148 locations in 30 states and 130 cities.

Categories

  • Discount Stores
  • General Merchandise

Amenities

  • accepts credit cards

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